The OVF package is invalid and cannot be deployed – In the trenches with the AWS Discovery Connector

I was working with a customer recently who had trouble deploying the AWS Discovery Connector to their VMware environment. AWS offer this appliance as an OVA file. For those who aren’t aware, OVA (Open Virtualisation Archive) is an open standard used to describe virtual infrastructure to be deployed on a hypervisor of your choice. Typically speaking, these files are hashed with an algorithm to ensure that the contents of the files are not changed or modified in transit (prior to being deployed within your own environment.)

At the time of writing, AWS currently offer this appliance hashed in two flavours… MD5 or SHA256. All sounds quite reasonable right?

  • Download the OVA with a hash of your choice
  • Deploy to VMware.
  • Profit???

Wrong! I was surprised to receive an email from my customer stating that their deployment had failed (see below.)

There’s a small clue here…

The Solution

My immediate response was to fire up google and do some reading. Surely someone had blogged about this before? After all…. I am no VMware expert. I finally arrived at the VMware knowledge base, where I began sifting through supported ciphers for ESX/ESXi and vCenter. The findings were quite interesting, you can find them summarised below:

  • If your VMware cluster consists of hosts which run ESX/ESXi 4.1 or less (hopefully no one) – MD5 is supported
  • If your VMware cluster consists of hosts which run ESX/ESXi 5.x or 6.0 – SHA1 is supported
  • If your VMware cluster consists of hosts which run ESX/ESXi 6.5 or greater – SHA256 is supported

In the particular environment I was working in, the customer had multiple environments with a mix of 5.5 and 6.0 physical hosts. As I was short on time, I had no real way of telling if the MD5 hashed image would deploy on a newer environment. I also don’t have a VMware development environment to test this approach on (by design.)

After a few more minutes of googling, I was rewarded with another VMware knowledge base article. VMware provide a small utility called “OVFTool.” This applications sole purpose in life is to convert OVA files (you guessed it) ensuring that they are hashed with supported cipher of your choice. In my scenario, the file was re-written using the supported SHA1 cipher. All of this was triggered from a windows command line by executing:

ovftool.exe –shaAlgorithm=SHA1 <source image.ova> <destination image.ova>

After this I was able to successfully deploy the AWS Discovery Connector OVA as expected using my freshly minted image.

You can grab a copy of the tool – here

You can read more about VMware supported ciphers – here

Finally, I should call out that this solution is not specific to deploying the AWS Discovery Connector. Consider this approach if you are experiencing similar symptoms deploying another OVA based appliance in your VMware environment.

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